August 29, 2019

Food Delivery Experiment - AMP Agency Customer Experience Deep-Dive

The 21st century food shopping experience is all about efficiently streamlining tasks. This is evident not just through significant investments in eCommerce, but also through the rise in delivery service offerings. Online food delivery is booming in particular — the number of Americans who have ordered food online has grown from 17 to 24 percent in the past year. With so many options available, I grew curious about the details differentiating each app’s respective shopping experience. I decided to order from a different app each day for four days, journaling my thoughts while munching on salad one day and sipping soup the next. 

 

Convenience means comfort — especially for online food delivery

It was a Wednesday night, and I had ordered a soup from my favorite restaurant, eager to maximize my comfiness after a tiring day. After two respective days of UberEats and Postmates, I had settled into a pleasant routine of online food ordering.

 

When I saw that my “Dasher” (of the DoorDash app) had arrived, I summoned up the strength to pause my show, leave my couch, and walk to the door. After receiving my food, I collapsed back on the couch. Upon opening the bag, however, I was disappointed to find that there was no spoon for my soup. I sighed, paused Mad Men, turned on the lights, and made my way to the kitchen.


I thought back. Did I forget to indicate that I wanted utensils? Was there a field that suggested including them? Perhaps an “add note” section?

Spoon soup photo

Pictured: my squash soup and the accompanying slices of bread. Peeking out in the top right is the infamous spoon from my kitchen.

 

Brand takeaway: My primary reason for ordering food delivery wasn’t just about convenience -  I had a vision of curling up in front of a show in my pajamas, and treating myself to minimal movement and maximal indulgence. While the spoon debacle wasn’t catastrophic, it interrupted that vision. If delivery services can identify the true need-states they fulfil, they can better cater to them — and ensure that shoppers have the most seamless ordering experience as possible.

 

Trusting tech is hard. 

Inputting one’s preferences on an app — without any human interaction — leaves room for doubt. What if the kitchen messes up my order or the app glitches? What if the driver doesn’t get my note to come up to the 8th floor of my office building? 

 

I sat in my office’s lobby, this last question lingering in my mind. I saw on the Postmates tracking system that my driver was “here,” but I didn’t see him. Did my Postmate leave the food in the downstairs lobby? Was he in the elevator? Was he waiting for me to meet him outside? After a few minutes, I gave up, went down 8 floors, and saw my food waiting for me at the front desk. The receipt taped to my salad didn’t have the full address I wrote in the app, which included “AMP Agency, 8th floor.”

 

Brand takeaway: Two-way communication is key. As technologically advanced as today’s shopping experience is, there’s always room for error when relaying information. Shoppers will naturally worry about an app acting as a middleman between them and their food. To lessen this worry delivery services can assure the shopper that their unique details have been “seen” by their driver, maybe even sending them a notification of a “read receipt.” 

 

It feels good to feel heard.

Scrolling through DoorDash’s restaurant options, I hoped to see the bahn mi sandwich cafe just a couple miles away. I searched for “Vietnamese.” It appeared, alongside a button that said “request,” suggesting an option to add the restaurant to DoorDash’s offerings. Wow, I thought. They care about what I want!

 

Doordash photo

A screenshot of me single-handedly bettering Boston’s bahn mi delivery scene.

 

Brand takeaway: No reasonable customer expects for a food delivery app to mirror their every preference. A small gesture that acknowledges a shopper’s wants (accompanied with the hope of fulfilling them), validates the shopper. This subtle approach to customer satisfaction allows the shopper to feel both that their opinion matters, and that the app genuinely wishes to improve its service.

 

Superlatives

Like many consumers, I honed my preferences by trying multiple services. I like to think that I’m now qualified enough to assign (subjective) superlatives to each app’s respective customer experience.

 

  • Best delivery time predictor: UberEats

Of all the apps, UberEats was the only one that didn’t adjust its delivery time, estimating the total cooking and delivery time very well. Would recommend for squeezing meals in between meetings.

 

  • Best first-delivery perks: Doordash

I still don’t understand whether I stumbled upon some month-of-July promotion or if the first delivery fee is always waived. Regardless, my frugal self was pleased at this opportunity to save some money.

 

  • Best notification experience: Grubhub

While some apps blasted my phone with notifications via app, email, and text, Grubhub let me manually input how I wished to be notified upon arrival of my food. I typed “please call when you’re outside” and my request was fulfilled.

 

Grubhub photo 1

 A blank canvas for notification preferences

 

  • Best delivery flexibility: Postmates

Free delivery if I join a “party?” By. All. Means. Postmates’s “party” option allows one’s delivery to be pooled with others in the area. The catch: delivery time could be as long as an hour. Without pressing appointments, party-ing is a lovely option to save on delivery costs.


Postmates-photo

Extrovert, introvert, dancer – or not – Postmates has a “party” for all.

 

  • Most likely to use again: UberEats 

A delivery fee cheaper than others, many restaurant options, and a familiar GPS format (I take the occasional Uber, so I’m biased), UberEats is my food delivery app of choice. Bonus perks: The UberRewards program. With every eligible meal and Uber ride, I get points that I can use for either.

January 5, 2017

There's a Massive Restaurant Industry Bubble, and It's About to Burst

thrillist.jpg

America's Golden Age of Restaurants is coming to an end. Rising labor costs, rent increases, a pandemic of similar restaurants, demanding customers unwilling to come to terms with higher prices -- it's the Perfect Restaurant Industry Storm. Customers are no longer impressed by local, farm-sourced, and handmade -- it's expected. Those elevated expectations extend to delivery. And the rising food delivery apps promising local, higher-quality foods at cheap prices are replacing fast-dining.

 

The next phase of the gentrification of food.

December 15, 2016

It's All Part of the Packaging: How Marketing Can Solve the Problems Food and Drink Brands Face

Screen Shot 2016-12-15 at 11.20.53 AM.pngThe food and drink industry faces criticism from every angle. From government regulations on the advertisement of alcohol, society’s pressures to keep trim and slim and ‘Lean In Fifteen’, to the impact of waste and resource on the world’s rising temperature; food and drink brands have to cater for any possible criticism.

How sweet it can be.

December 15, 2016

Here’s Why LaCroix is So Addictive

Screen Shot 2016-12-15 at 11.16.02 AM.png

The internet was going crazy for this stuff and soon, so were we. It quickly took up more space in our fridge than actual food and filled our recycling bins to the top, even after we crushed them one by one. At some point, I started to wonder: What’s actually in this stuff? And why is it so incredibly addicting?

LaCroix's allure.

December 14, 2016

The Undoing and Redoing of Food

1*23r3zsCLx4s2s3MIzrNX-A.jpeg

The nation’s largest food companies now face competitive pressure from two different directions. From one side, there is a movement toward simplicity — simpler recipes, fewer ingredients, less processing. A nice way to label this shift toward simpler foods is “the undoing of food.” At the same time, and from the opposite direction, there is the “re-doing of food” — a process whereby entrepreneurs take on existing categories and seek to reinvent them in a way that improves on the incumbent.

Unfeed me.

December 8, 2016

The Rhythm of Food

Screen Shot 2016-12-08 at 1.27.51 PM.pngHow do we search for food? Google search interest can reveal key food trends over the years. From the rise and fall of recipes over diets and drinks to cooking trends and regional cuisines. What can we learn about food culture by analyzing the yearly cycles in search interest for food, dishes, ingredients, and recipes?

The many facets of food.

November 29, 2016

The Real Story Behind McDonald’s Mysterious 'Gold Card' — The Ticket to Unlimited Free Fast Food That Bill Gates and Warren Buffett Have in Their Wallets

4061201826_ee21f9511d_b.jpeg

When Rob Lowe appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live with a golden McDonald’s card last year, one big question remained: How could the Average Joe get his own card that granted him access to unlimited McDonald's? Not easily, a little sleuthing revealed.

Not a piece of hotcake.

November 17, 2016

Chick-fil-A Rehatches Its Website to Better Reach Fans

sandwich20161116.jpg

Today, Chick-fil-A has launched a redesigned website with feature stories, recipes, GIFs, videos and other content as it tries to strengthen their connection with fans. The menu is now programmed to show the proper items for the time of day whenever someone logs on. So if it is before 10:30 a.m., the viewer will see the breakfast menu, while later in the afternoon they could be tempted by treats such as ice cream, cookies and milkshakes.

What will they show on Sundays?

November 15, 2016

Taco Bell's New Logo Coincides With Vegas Strip Debut

TacoBellLogos.jpg

Taco Bell is ringing in the new week with a new look and a new address. The fast-food chain is updating its logo for the first time in more than 20 years. The new look coincides with Monday's opening of its first flagship store, located on the Las Vegas Strip. The revamped look and sexy location are the latest ways Taco Bell is trying to connect with young, hip diners.

Out with the old, in with the new.

November 7, 2016

You Will Soon Be Able to Order McDonald's From Your Smartphone

image.0.0.jpg

McDonald's has long been a leader in the fast food industry, but it has fallen behind its competitors in one big way: it hasn’t provided customers with a way to order and pay for their meals via smartphone or other mobile device. Now, the company is getting ready to roll out mobile order-and-pay technology.

McApp coming your way.

Recent

Popular