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What Happened to Social Media Being a Conversation Platform Instead Of an Echo Chamber?

We are what we read online and this can be dangerous. Curated and personalized news feeds are driving us into holes we might not be able to dig ourselves out of – meaning, we’re becoming more and more self-absorbed with those that share our own views. It’s like an episode of Black Mirror, but instead it’s reality. Hard conversations matter.

  • November 22, 2016

The End of Relaxation

We live in a golden age of the “wellness vacation,” a sort of hybrid retreat, boot camp, spa and roving therapy session that, for the cost of room and board, promises to refresh body and mind and send you back to your life more whole. Whatever happened to a good book and a martini? Sign of the times.

The 8 Friends You Make in the Modern Workplace

Work friends are, if not essential to survival in the office, at least essential to enjoying the office. The Times polled about the types most often found, from the office know-it-alls to the people who always seem to have the freshest gossip. Here's a little user's guide for you. Friends are family, too.

Modern Loyalty: Love in a Time of Infinite Choice

They say brand loyalty is dead. They say Millennials are to blame. Or maybe constant connection is exposing people to more choices than ever before. What we do know for sure is that brand loyalty still matters. And it’s anything but dead. Facebook IQ surveyed 14,700 adults in the US, taking a look at the state of loyalty today in five verticals: Auto Insurance, Airlines, Hotels, Grocery and Restaurants. Loyalty above everything.

The NFL Was a Sure Thing for TV Networks. Until Now

Pro football, which has riveted TV viewers for decades, is now repelling them. Ratings are down across the board, particularly during prime-time games. So far this season, Monday Night Football ratings are down 20 percent from this time last year. Blame the banter.

Inside Equinox Gym's Perfectly Fit World (and Top-Secret Club)

In the beginning, there were gymnasiums. Open spaces in ancient Greece where men trained, often nude, to compete in public games. Now, there is Equinox, a gym that brings the men and women of cities’ top tax brackets under one roof and strips the gym experience of the greasiness and odor. Folks will pay almost any amount of money to achieve the level of luxury they feel suits their lifestyle. Nobody has understood this better than Equinox, which has brought the innocent gymnasium to its evolutionary peak: the E club. You can't lift with us.

Why Do Millennials Hate Groceries?

Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that twenty- and thirtysomethings are bidding adieu to yet another cultural mainstay of the Baby Boomer generation—shopping trips to supermarkets. With an abundance of options on the streets and at their fingertips, young shoppers are eating out at restaurants and bars, ordering in on their phones, or snagging groceries at convenience stores, such as CVS, and superstores, such as Walmart. Don't blame the young folks.

How the Internet Is Loosening Our Grip on the Truth

Next week, if all goes well, someone will win the presidency. What happens after that is anyone’s guess. Will the losing side believe the results? Will we all be able to clean up the piles of lies, hoaxes and other dung that have been hurled so freely in this hyper-charged, fact-free election? Much of that remains unclear, because the internet is distorting our collective grasp on the truth. You can't handle the truth.

The End of Adolescence

In the 20th century, the concept of adolescence offered a bridge from the innocence of childhood to the responsibilities of adult life. Now, the bridge is sagging at both ends as the innocence of childhood has become more difficult to protect, and adulthood is long delayed. While adolescence once helped frame many matters regarding the teen years, it is no longer an adequate way to understand what is happening to the youth population. And it no longer offers a roadmap for how they can be expected to mature. Not anymore.

An Ivy League Professor Says There Are Only Three Types of Friendships We Make

Friendship isn’t always as serendipitous as it might feel; according to new research, there are just three ways people typically structure their social lives. When striking up new connections, people are either “tight-knitters,” “compartmentalizers,” or “samplers,” according to Dartmouth sociology professor Janice McCabe. Which one are you?

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