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why-unbundling.pngTo say that the Internet has changed the media business is so obvious. It turns out that the impact of the Internet — and the outlook for the future — differs considerably depending on what part of the media industry you look at. Most of the changes in the last three years were simply laying the groundwork for actual shifts in behavior. Once those shifts start to happen in earnest, there will be feedback loops in everything from advertising to content production to consumption that will accelerate the changes, resulting in a transformed media landscape that will impact all parts of society.

 

The end is nearer than you think.

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Size inclusivity is one of the hottest topics in today’s fashion industry. From creator trends on TikTok to full-blown brand transformations — like Old Navy’s Bodequality campaign — this idea is popping up all over the fashion world. While there is a clear connection between fashion and size inclusivity, this is a conversation that brands in all industries can and should be engaging in. Read on to learn how and why size inclusivity has become important to many fashion brands, as well as how non-fashion brands and their customers can benefit from incorporating size-inclusive strategies, tactics and creative.   A revolution in the fashion industry There’s been a revolution in the fashion industry over the last 15-20 years. In the early 2000s, many retailers offered clothing sizes only up to L or occasionally XL, and the plus-size stores that existed (e.g. Lane Bryant and Torrid) were few and far between. This was back before “body positivity” and “real beauty” became buzz words, back when it was rare to see models over a size 0. Fast forward to today and size inclusivity is woven into the fabric of many fashion brands. Budget-friendly brands like Target and high-end fashion brands like Christian Siriano have evolved their clothing lines to include more sizing options for consumers. The global plus-size clothing market is worth $178 billion, while the US market is worth $24 billion, according to Vogue Business.  When it comes to size representation in advertising and marketing, fashion brands are embracing diversity more than ever. Two brands we admire in this space are Thinx (check out their Instagram channel for inspiration) and Aerie (shoutout to the #AerieREAL campaign). It’s important to note that size inclusion in the fashion industry has traditionally focused primarily on cisgender women, although some brands like Rihanna’s Savage X Fenty — which spotlights plus-size male models — have started to change that. We’re excited to see how brands will evolve to better represent people of all sizes and genders.   What happened in the past few decades to bring size inclusivity to the forefront of fashion?  Much of the work being done today to promote size inclusivity has its roots in the Fat Acceptance Movement, which began in the late 1960s. Since then, an increasing number of people have been advocating for size inclusion. Size inclusivity is also part of a larger movement for more diverse representation of bodies that intersects with race, sex, disability, gender, and more. Social media has rapidly propelled the movement for inclusivity. A 2016 article from Adweek sheds light on this point: “On platforms like Instagram and Twitter, women who have for so long felt ignored by mainstream fashion are finally able to have a voice. They're sharing body-positive selfies and hashtags, following plus-size bloggers like GabiFresh and Nicolette Mason (whose massive audiences have led to magazine columns and designer partnerships) and letting brands know exactly what they think.” Social media has helped publicize the desire for representation and has given consumers an interactive platform they can use to ask brands for it directly. In addition to advocacy and social pressure from consumers, many fashion brands have begun to engage with size inclusivity because of the financial benefits. In a 2018 interview with Elle, famed fashion designer Christian Siriano said that adding plus sizes to his line tripled his business. And as previously mentioned, the US market for plus-size clothing is worth $24 billion.  But the rising popularity of size inclusivity in fashion goes deeper than advocacy, social media or even finance. Size inclusivity is powerful because it resonates with a universal human truth: People want to feel like they belong. As co-founder of Body Confidence Canada said in a BBC interview, “Being able to walk into a store and find your size makes customers feel they are seen.” Feeling seen is a powerful emotional response. It’s the kind of thing that can positively impact someone’s personal life and their purchasing decisions. From this perspective, size inclusivity is a win-win.   All brands should care about size inclusivity  If you don’t work with or own a fashion brand, you may at this point be wondering how size inclusivity applies to your brand. Clearly, there’s a connection between fashion and size. Clothing items are almost always differentiated by this characteristic. But what if you sell a product or service that’s less clearly related, or appears to be completely unrelated? Should size inclusivity still factor into your marketing strategy? Yes. The reality is that people of all sizes drive cars, wear perfume and buy houses. People of all sizes travel the world and go to concerts. Someone who wears a size 0 is no more or less likely to need glasses than someone who wears a size 24. Muscle mass doesn’t determine your taste in toothbrushes. So, why is there such a small range in the bodies we see in advertisements for these products?   Addressing popular arguments against size inclusivity Argument 1: Showing bigger people in the media promotes poor health and glorifies obesity. In an article about a Sports Illustrated fashion show that included plus-size models, BBC News quoted Dr. Brad Frankum, president of the Australian Medical Association in New South Wales, saying: “If we send very overweight or obese people down the catwalk modelling clothes, what it is saying, in a way, is that we are celebrating obesity. I think that is dangerous because we know it is a dangerous health condition.” This argument is erroneous for several reasons. First, it’s impossible to determine someone’s physical health by looking at their size alone. Size does not tell us how often a person works out or what their diet, blood pressure, etc. is. Second, this argument fails to take into account healthy reasons for weight gain. Someone might gain weight as the result of switching between antidepressants or trying to work on an eating disorder. Some disabilities are also associated with weight gain, and that’s certainly not a good reason to exclude someone from representation. Third, while there is no strong evidence to support the idea that representing larger bodies is “dangerous,” there is ample evidence to show that size stigma has harmful effects. Examples can be found here: “Eating Disorders and Social Media Prove Difficult to Untangle” from The New York Times “Weight stigma study in the U.S. and 5 other nations shows the worldwide problem of such prejudice” from The Washington Post “The Impact of Weight Stigma on our Mental Health” from Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment   Argument 2: It’s not fine to be fat. This language is taken word for word from the headline of a 2018 opinion piece from The Guardian. Journalist Lizzie Cernik writes: “…as we move away from the skinny goals of the mid-2000s and embrace different shapes and sizes, one group of campaigners has taken things a step too far. Fronted by plus-sized models and social media influencers, the fat acceptance movement aims to normalise obesity, letting everyone know that it’s fine to be fat.” Who gets to decide which bodies are “fine” and “not fine”? Cernik presents being fat as a moral failing. This ignores the reality that size varies for so many different reasons. It’s also body shaming, which never feels good to the person being shamed, and has proven negative health side effects, like increased rates of depression and anxiety. As advertisers and marketers, is this the attitude we want to show towards our current and potential customers? We think not. But let’s remove emotion from the equation for a moment. Consider the average American consumer. What do they look like? The CDC states that 73.6% of adults ages 20 and up are “overweight, including obesity.” If we do not include overweight and/or obese individuals in our marketing and advertising, we are excluding almost three-quarters of American adults from representation. This does not seem like good business sense. Argument 3: Beauty matters and straying from beauty norms in a brand’s marketing will negatively impact the perceived attractiveness of its products. We agree that beauty is often important in advertising and marketing, and we also believe that beauty takes countless shapes, forms and sizes. Only viewing beauty through societal norms is limiting. Additionally, beauty trends and perceptions are changing all the time. Renaissance paintings portray very different body ideals from magazine covers. These days, “thick” figures are popularly seen as attractive. Dad bods are celebrated. Un-Photoshopped belly rolls are lauded. Size inclusivity is in.   Argument 4: My customers don’t care about size inclusivity. Tennis legend Billie Jean King said, “You have to see it to be it.” If people can’t see themselves in our campaigns, if they can’t relate to the people we show using our products and services, how are they supposed to connect with our brand? And if they don’t connect with our brand, why would they want to buy what we’re selling? More and more consumers are looking for authenticity and connection, and diverse representation is one way to achieve this. Here are some things your brand can do to get involved with size inclusivity, no matter which industry it is in: Use size inclusive stock imagery and footage. Intentionally search for images that include people of varying sizes. Check out AllGo for free plus-size stock photos. AllGo also offers inclusive design consulting services. Work with models of all different sizes. Unsure where to look? L'Officiel has a great list of inclusive modelling agencies. IMG models recently created a division called Brawn that represents plus-size male models. You might also consider scouting models on social media by searching popular hashtags like #SizeInclusive and #InclusiveFashion. Partner with influencers who reflect a range of sizes. Again, using relevant social media hashtags can help with your search. Consider talking about size inclusivity on social media (if it feels on brand and authentic). If your brand has a good track record of being size inclusive with its products, services or representation, consider sharing why it matters to your brand on social media. Another way to join the conversation is to kindly but firmly shut down body shaming when you see it in the comments on your social posts. Stay on top of size-inclusive trends across industries. Don’t be afraid to look to other brands for inspiration! While the fashion industry is a great place to start, there are also brands in other industries putting out great size-inclusive work (shout out to Sephora). Avoid body shaming and weight-related jokes in your campaigns. No matter what your intentions are, body shaming and jokes about size are almost guaranteed to offend someone. And since the majority of Americans are now considered overweight, as previously mentioned, you could end up offending a lot of someones. Think about how you can make your workplace more size inclusive. This might look like offering more sizes for company clothing or choosing office furniture that accommodates higher weight limits.  In the past few years, many brands have made efforts to increase representation in their marketing and advertising campaigns, but few outside of the fashion industry have made size inclusivity a priority in these efforts. Can your brand help lead the way?

In our continuing series of examining Google Search Trends to gain insights into the top keywords queried in the USA, we present our findings for December 2021. Every day, we capture the top three keyword phrases in terms of search volume as reported by Google Trends (US Only). Each term has an estimated query volume attached to it, which we also record. The number scale tops out at 10,000,000+ with a lower limit of 200,000+. After the conclusion of the month, we look at the phrases we collected along with their volumes to get an understanding of what drove queries for the month. 2021 Comes To a Merciful End Another year comes to a close and so does our reporting of Google Trends analysis for 2021. It is sometimes fun to compare our takes with what Google’s marketing presents from its own data.  Their campaign showcased an increase in the search volume for the phrase “how to heal”. Yes, we do see that uptick in Google Trends for that search term in this all time view. Looking at this chart, we can see that there are peaks in the month of July over the last few years, which lines up with a related phrase “how to heal tattoo”.   Are we, as a people, trying to heal holistically from the pressures of the modern world or just from body art that we get in the summer?  We can only guess.   Last month, we saw top searched keywords in the typical categories: Sports, Entertainment, and Holidays. There were a few phrases attached to current events that are worth noting and a few keywords related to tech companies. With that, here’s our take on December 2021 Google Trends.   The Top Queried Phrases In December 2021 There were two Google Doodles that drove people to query a phrase in the search engine just by clicking on the modified logo: Winter Season - 12/20/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries New Year's Eve - 12/30/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries Appropriate for this month, the start of winter and NYE doodles got people to interact with Google results   The third phrase, also queried ten million plus times, was less celebratory in nature with the passing of American actress Betty White on the 31st. Betty White birthday - 12/31/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries It’s curious that the phrase reported by Google Trends was related to her birthday in January as she was about to turn 100 on January 17th.  Typically when a famous person dies, their name is what is reported by Google Trends. We feel that this keyword shows that people were wondering how soon she was going to reach the century mark.    ‘Tis The Holiday Season When we think of December, we think of holidays.  Here are the holiday-related queries from last month: Pearl Harbor Day - 12/6/2021 - 500,000+ queries NORAD Santa tracker - 12/23/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Merry Christmas - 12/24/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries New Year's Day - 12/31/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries We can attribute some of the query volume of the New Year’s Day term to a Doodle that was published on Jan.1. Knowing that Google is on Pacific Standard Time, some of that New Year query volume was captured on the 31st. What Do You Want To Watch? We love our TV shows. Here are the most popular ones that aired or premiered in December 2021: Facts of Life Live - 12/7/2021 - 200,000+ queries And Just Like That - 12/8/2021 - 500,000+ queries Miss Universe - 12/11/2021 - 500,000+ queries Who won The Voice 2021 - 12/13/2021 - 500,000+ queries The Witcher - 12/17/2021 - 500,000+ queries The AMP SEO team thinks that if a movie title appears in the top 3 phrases in Google Trends daily searches, people will go see it in droves. If it appears across multiple days, then it really has high interest. Spider-Man: No Way Home - 12/14/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Spider-Man: No Way Home - 12/16/2021 - 500,000+ queries Matrix - 12/22/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Sing 2 - 12/22/2021 - 200,000+ queries Don't Look Up - 12/24/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Now The Matrix Resurrections, Sing 2, and Don’t Look Up are probably going to be viewed by many people, but Spider-Man: No Way Home is on its own level. As of this writing, the film has earned $668.8 million to date and is the sixth-highest-grossing U.S. distributed theater movie of all time. Over the course of 2021, the film appeared in Google Trends Top 3 queries on seven separate dates.  From Google Trends, we could see that the buzz/hype for this movie was enormous.   Weather Event and Other Natural Occurrences There were a few weather events that drove people to search.  Some, unfortunately, were deadly: Hawaii blizzard - 12/3/2021 - 200,000+ queries Mayfield, Ky - 12/10/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Meteor shower tonight - 12/13/2021 - 200,000+ queries Colorado - 12/30/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries The devastating tornado that affected Mayfield, KY among other towns and cities was the event that drove the most volume.   Yep, More COVID-19 Queries Just when we thought we were out of the woods, the Omicron variant brought COVID cases back up. Right after Christmas, people were searching about COVID: CDC COVID guidelines - 12/27/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Walgreens COVID testing - 12/27/2021 - 500,000+ queries We really hope we don’t have to report any COVID keywords in 2022.    What’s Going On In Tech? We categorized these phrases as tech-related but their intent varies. Spotify Wrapped 2021 - 12/1/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Bitcoin - 12/3/2021 - 200,000+ queries AWS outage - 12/7/2021 - 500,000+ queries   Let’s get the phrases with negative intent out of the way first. On the 3rd, Bitcoin lost value and Amazon Web Services had an outage on the 7th. On the positive side, we love the Spotify Wrapped feature and look forward to it each December. From its inclusion in the daily Top 3, it appears that many people enjoy it too.  Looking at search volume over the last 5 years, it looks like 2020 was the bigger year for Wrapped.  We’ll see what 2022 will bring for the music streaming company.   The Wide World of Sports Over the last three years of recording this data, we know that sports-related keywords get the most volume. We decided to break down the most popular phrases into their own sub-categories: The 5 million plus club had a couple of notable deaths and a college football team: Demaryius Thomas - 12/9/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries John Madden - 12/28/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Alabama football - 12/31/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Jake Paul boxes and people are interested in his bouts: Jake Paul - 12/17/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Jake Paul vs Tyron Woodley - 12/17/2021 - 500,000+ queries Jake Paul - 12/18/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries European Football has fans in the USA: Manchester United - 12/2/2021 - 200,000+ queries The most popular NFL teams are the ones that are searched the most: Cowboys - 12/2/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Patriots - 12/6/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Steelers - 12/9/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Packers - 12/12/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Dallas Cowboys - 12/12/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Rams - 12/13/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Patriots - 12/18/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Tampa Bay Buccaneers - 12/19/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Packers - 12/25/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Dallas Cowboys - 12/26/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Miami Dolphins - 12/27/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries We can say the same thing about college football teams too: Oregon football - 12/3/2021 - 500,000+ queries Alabama vs Georgia - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Michigan football - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Georgia Football - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Michigan football - 12/5/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Army Navy game - 12/10/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Oklahoma football - 12/29/2021 - 500,000+ queries Over the last three years of recording this data, we know that sports-related keywords get the most volume. We decided to break down the most popular phrases into their own sub-categories:   The 5 million plus club had a couple of notable deaths and a college football team: Demaryius Thomas - 12/9/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries John Madden - 12/28/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Alabama football - 12/31/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Jake Paul boxes and people are interested in his bouts: Jake Paul - 12/17/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Jake Paul vs Tyron Woodley - 12/17/2021 - 500,000+ queries Jake Paul - 12/18/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries European Football has fans in the USA: Manchester United - 12/2/2021 - 200,000+ queries The most popular NFL teams are the ones that are searched the most: Cowboys - 12/2/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Patriots - 12/6/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Steelers - 12/9/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Packers - 12/12/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Dallas Cowboys - 12/12/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Rams - 12/13/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Patriots - 12/18/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Tampa Bay Buccaneers - 12/19/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Packers - 12/25/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Dallas Cowboys - 12/26/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Miami Dolphins - 12/27/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries We can say the same thing about college football teams too: Oregon football - 12/3/2021 - 500,000+ queries Alabama vs Georgia - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Michigan football - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Georgia Football - 12/4/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Michigan football - 12/5/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Army Navy game - 12/10/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Oklahoma football - 12/29/2021 - 500,000+ queries An NBA player broke the three-pointer record:  Steph Curry - 12/14/2021 - 500,000+ queries Lastly, UFC has a large following too: UFC - 12/11/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries There were more sports related phrases, 46 in all.  When you collect 93 phrases and their estimated search volume on a daily basis, you get a good understanding of how popular sports are in the USA.   Thanks for reading. If you liked this article, we utilize search trends data for all of our clients and we invite you to learn more about our SEO services. Until next month.

In our continuing series of examining Google Search Trends to gain insights into the top keywords queried in the USA, we present our findings for November 2021. Every day, we capture the top three keyword phrases in terms of search volume as reported by Google Trends (US Only). Each term has an estimated query volume attached to it, which we also record. The number scale tops out at 10,000,000+ with a lower limit of 200,000+. After the conclusion of the month, we look at the phrases we collected along with their volumes to get an understanding of what drove queries for the month. What Were The Takeaways For November 2021? Looking back at last month, we’re reminded that elections happen somewhere in the country in November.  There were a few elections that gained national attention and we saw that in the top searches near the beginning of the month. Two criminal trials were big news and people were interested in them enough to search for details related to the cases. Holidays and holiday shopping are always big in November and we’ll showcase this year’s keywords. Lastly, there were a few interesting odds and ends to discuss to wrap up our examination of the month.   Oodles of Doodles The month of November had special Google logos that drove more than 10 million queries each. Here’s the list of the queries attached to those Doodles in chronological order: Day of the Dead - 11/2/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries Dr. Kamal Ranadive - 11/7/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries Veterans Day - 11/10/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries Johannes Vermeer - 11/11/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries History of Thanksgiving - 11/25/2021 - 10,000,000+ queries Day of the Dead was a multi-day Doodle and we also recorded the 10 million plus queries at the end of October too. Dr. Ranadive was honored on what would have been her 104th birthday for her research on links between cancers and viruses.  The Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer got a Doodle that celebrated the 26th anniversary of the exhibition that opened at Washington D.C.’s national Gallery of Art. Lastly, Veterans Day and Thanksgiving received Doodles that sent people to learn more about these holidays.   State Governor Elections Right at the start of the month, search interest in U.S. elections grew and was captured by the AMP SEO team: Glenn Youngkin - 11/1/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries N.J governor race - 11/2/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Virginia election results - 11/2/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Election day 2021 - 11/3/2021 - 200,000+ queries   The Governor races in New Jersey and Virginia were the elections that drove the most queries, including the winner of the VA election, Glenn Youngkin.  This list is a reminder that important elections happen every year and not just every four years.   The Criminal Trials of November A couple of high profile court cases drove search volume over many days in November 2021. Kyle Rittenhouse - 11/8/2021 - 500,000+ queries Kyle Rittenhouse trial - 11/10/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Rittenhouse - 11/15/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Kyle Rittenhouse - 11/15/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Rittenhouse - 11/19/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Ahmaud Arbery - 11/22/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Ahmaud Arbery - 11/24/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries   From the lists above, queries related to the Rittenhouse trial made the daily top 3 in Google’s Daily Trends across five days.  Queries related to the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial only appeared on two days.  The AMP SEO team pulled some charts from Google Trends to see a visualization of the query volume.   This chart represents query volume (interest) for the names of Kyle Rittenhouse and Ahmaud Arbery.  The blue line shows that the volume was much higher for Kyle’s name. Curiously, a slightly different take on the same subjects revealed a different story.  By switching the categorization of each of their names from “Search term” to “Topic”, we saw this chart: In this chart, you can see that queries related to the topic of Ahmaud Arbery appear to be larger than those of Kyle Rittenhouse.  From our understanding, topics are set up to include more phrases than just the singular keyword inputted into the tool.  It appears that Google Trends Daily report is more in line with exact keywords and not topics.  Queries From The World of Entertainment   Moving to a lighter subject, here are the queries related to what Americans were interested in watching in November. Eternals - 11/4/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Yellowstone season 4 - 11/7/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries CMA Awards 2021 - 11/10/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Spider-Man: No Way Home - 11/16/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries King Richard - 11/19/2021 - 1,000,000+ queries Hawkeye - 11/23/2021 - 500,000+ queries Spider-Man: No Way Home - 11/28/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries The Spider-Man movie queries were driven by trailers. The film isn’t hitting theaters until December 2021 but it’s clear people are excited about it.  Even though The Beatles documentary was released in November, search interest was not big enough to appear in the daily top 3. Interest in two singers was captured in November 2021: Britney Spears - 11/12/2021 - 500,000+ queries Adele - 11/14/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Yes, Britney’s conservatorship finally ended on the 12th and Adele performed on national television on the 14th ahead of her 30 album release. Holidays and Holiday Spending Besides Thanksgiving, there were other holidays including some shopping holidays: Diwali - 11/3/2021 - 500,000+ queries Thanksgiving - 11/24/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Happy Thanksgiving - 11/24/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Black Friday deals - 11/25/2021 - 5,000,000+ queries Best Buy - 11/26/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Cyber Monday deals - 11/28/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries   Diwali drove search interest on the 3rd and that search interest has grown over the last 5 years.  You can see how it has grown in this chart: After Thanksgiving, holiday shopping starts traditionally and the deals you can find on both Black Friday and Cyber Monday had people searching.  In years past, retailer names also made the daily top 3. This year, Best Buy was the lone brand with that distinction.    So Why Were People Searching Urban Dictionary So Much? Sometimes, keywords will appear in our daily capture and we’ll be left scratching our heads.  This keyword in particular not only had us guessing about the reason why people were querying it so much but also had us feeling a bit tentative about the prospect of learning more   Urban Dictionary - 11/21/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Thankfully, the reason was fairly innocuous. Because of a trending topic on Twitter, people were driven to search the online slang definition provider to learn more about their names as defined by Urban Dictionary. The AMP SEO team warns that your first name’s definition may not be safe for work.   Saving Time and Natural Phenomena Oh, turning our clocks back an hour always makes people search and sometimes, if there’s something to look at in the sky, people will search for that event too. Daylight Savings - 11/6/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries Lunar Eclipse 2021 - 11/18/2021 - 2,000,000+ queries We have to guess that some of those Daylight Savings queries are from people who wonder why we change our collective understanding of what time it is twice a year.  Omicron Variant Just when you thought we’d had enough of COVID-19 variants, there’s reports of a new one named Omicron.  Omicron variant symptoms - 11/27/2021 - 200,000+ queries This query shows us how people are seeking to understand the symptoms of this new variant rather than just general information about it. We’re keeping positive thoughts that this variant is the last one that we need to know about. Thanks for reading. If you liked this article, we utilize search trends data for all of our clients and we invite you to learn more about our SEO services. Until next month.