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How the MBTA Should be Using Facebook

First off, anyone who knows me knows that I tend to rant about my commute (in essence the MBTA) often. In theory, it's not a bad commute.  Six stops on the red line and a 'quick'? switch to the green line for another two stops. It doesn't sound that bad, and should take about 40 minutes door-to-door on a good day. But on a bad day, which let's face it is most days for the MBTA, it can be an absolute nightmare. My most recent hellish trip home on a 90+ degree day took an hour and fifteen minutes (due to a derailed train, random schedule adjustment or 'just because,'? no one really knows). The crazy thing is that we're talking a driving distance of less than five miles! Although I guess I should just be grateful that I was on a train with working AC (it's the little things, right?). My chosen method of expressing my feelings about a given commute is often Facebook. When I'm sitting on a stagnant train (at one of those rare stops where I get service), I whip out my trusty iPhone and post whatever experience I'm having in that moment. And boom, what happens next?  Usually, a flurry of 'likes'? from friends and often a slew of comments from people commiserating about similar experiences. Ideally, my frustrated posts would elicit real-time responses from MBTA officials ' perhaps explaining the situation, or maybe even just apologizing for my frustration and acknowledging that they 'get it.'? In a recent webinar I attended, 'likeable social media'? guru Dave Kerpen said that without a doubt, 'I'm sorry'? are the two most important words in the social media sphere. If a business addresses the comments it shows that they're truly interested in customer feedback and committed to taking steps to making the customer happy. In the end, an apology from the MBTA wouldn't get me home faster, but I would absolutely appreciate the sentiment and their respect for my feelings and time. It would make me feel like someone is listening and that they fda approved cialis might even care. It's no surprise that when you do a Facebook search for MBTA, some of the top results are negative customer-created pages for people to share their tirades. In fact, the MBTA doesn't even seem to have an official page and therefore no platform that allows for them to shape their own message and potentially turn negatives into positives. Starting an official page is absolutely, positively, unequivocally Step 1 in my opinion. Next month, I'll be moving off the red line and into the North End where I'll have less than a five minute walk to work. I'm excited to have an opportunity to experience a new Boston neighborhood for sure, but I'm beyond overjoyed to be able eliminate commuting on the T from my daily life. Harsh, maybe, but true. Maybe if they had showed more of an interest in engaging me as a customer I wouldn't have felt the need to go off the map. In the meantime, I'll keep an eye out for their Facebook page'?¦ if anyone's listening.

How the MBTA Should be Using Facebook

First off, anyone who knows me knows that I tend to rant about my commute (in essence the MBTA) often. In theory, it's not a bad commute.  Six stops on the red line and a 'quick'? switch to the green line for another two stops. It doesn't sound that bad, and should take about 40 minutes door-to-door on a good day. But on a bad day, which let's face it is most days for the MBTA, it can be an absolute nightmare. My most recent hellish trip home on a 90+ degree day took an hour and fifteen minutes (due to a derailed train, random schedule adjustment or 'just because,'? no one really knows). The crazy thing is that we're talking a driving distance of less than five miles! Although I guess I should just be grateful that I was on a train with working AC (it's the little things, right?). My chosen method of expressing my feelings about a given commute is often Facebook. When I'm sitting on a stagnant train (at one of those rare stops where I get service), I whip out my trusty iPhone and post whatever experience I'm having in that moment. And boom, what happens next?  Usually, a flurry of 'likes'? from friends and often a slew of comments from people commiserating about similar experiences. Ideally, my frustrated posts would elicit real-time responses from MBTA officials ' perhaps explaining the situation, or maybe even just apologizing for my frustration and acknowledging that they 'get it.'? In a recent webinar I attended, 'likeable social media'? guru Dave Kerpen said that without a doubt, 'I'm sorry'? are the two most important words in the social media sphere. If a business addresses the comments it shows that they're truly interested in customer feedback and committed to taking steps to making the customer happy. In the end, an apology from the MBTA wouldn't get me home faster, but I would absolutely appreciate the sentiment and their respect for my feelings and time. It would make me feel like someone is listening and that they fda approved cialis might even care. It's no surprise that when you do a Facebook search for MBTA, some of the top results are negative customer-created pages for people to share their tirades. In fact, the MBTA doesn't even seem to have an official page and therefore no platform that allows for them to shape their own message and potentially turn negatives into positives. Starting an official page is absolutely, positively, unequivocally Step 1 in my opinion. Next month, I'll be moving off the red line and into the North End where I'll have less than a five minute walk to work. I'm excited to have an opportunity to experience a new Boston neighborhood for sure, but I'm beyond overjoyed to be able eliminate commuting on the T from my daily life. Harsh, maybe, but true. Maybe if they had showed more of an interest in engaging me as a customer I wouldn't have felt the need to go off the map. In the meantime, I'll keep an eye out for their Facebook page'?¦ if anyone's listening.

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