Our BLOG

Polaroid + Digital Camera = Bad Romance (Lady Gaga pun most definitely intended'?¦)

Nerd alert! The annual International Consumer Electronics Show (CES for those in the know) wrapped up this past weekend with a 3D flurry of tablets and mobile phones galore. I'm not even remotely close to being considered a techie, but I always find myself excited to hear about the 'next big thing'? when the convention rolls around each year. After scrolling the headlines and skimming through countless product launches that were over my head, I noticed Polaroid. Around this time last year Polaroid announced Lady Gaga as Creative Director, which seemed like a smart move for a seemingly 'dying'? brand that desperately needed an injection of style and creativity after going bankrupt (again). Polaroid had become a cult favorite among hipsters and the fashion industry, who mourned when film type after film type was discontinued over the years. In comes Gaga, who collaborated with Polaroid on a new product line called Grey Label, to save the day. According to Polaroid, the Grey Label products 'Showcase the Magic of the Polaroid Instant Experience.'? Don't get me started on the ridiculous GL20 Camera Glasses (fashionable Ray Ban Wayfarers these are not). Let's look at the GL30 Instant Digital Camera first. The camera, looking clunkier than ever, holds up to 10 photos, has a digital display and several filters and borders to choose from. No more waiting for the ink to dry, and gone are the days of having to make each shot really count. The GL10 Instant Mobile Printer, which Lady Gaga claims she pulls out at bars, allows consumers to send pictures from their GL30 Instant Digital Camera or Smartphone via Bluetooth. Um, ok. While Lady Gaga pulling out a (sort of) tiny printer at a bar and sharing hard copies with friends sounds cool, I can't imagine that I'd get the same reaction from my friends. Not to mention the fact that the printer isn't compatible with the iPhone, arguably one of the best camera phones on the market (check out this video to hear the resounding 'boos'? in the crowd when Gaga drops that bomb). In terms of photography in 2011, instant experience to me is taking a picture on my Smartphone and sending it to friends, or posting to my social network. These Polaroid 'improvements'? ruin everything endearingly kitsch about this brand for me. So'?¦marketers, Polaroid enthusiasts and/or Little Monsters, will this launch reinvent the Polaroid brand? Or, do you agree that it's somehow not really a Polaroid if you don't shake it? Sources: http://polaroid.com

Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? Path:

Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? Path:

    Related Posts