February 22, 2017

Transitional Millennial Shopper Behavior

Check out AMP's newest data visualization on the Transitional Millennial - https://www.ampagency.com/shopping-behaviors-millennials/

 

May 16, 2016

Hey Shopper Marketers... We Are Talking To You

“We are here to discuss the Shopper Marketing Challenge,” stated AMP Agency’s SVP of Advertising Technology, Chris Boucher. And discuss the Shopper Marketing Challenge, he did.

On May 10th, 2016, AMP Agency’s Shopper Digital Group, a member the Advantage Marketing Partners family focused on innovation in digital to drive shopper conversions and Ubimo, a platform designed to solve a brands’ ‘mobile advertising strategy’ hosted a break out session at the 2016 Mobile Marketing Leadership Forum.

The breakout session, “How Mobile and Local Data are Transforming Shopper Marketing,” focused on the disruptive impact of mobile on shopper marketing strategies. From real time campaign optimization for local audiences or outlet inventory, to actually measuring and attributing in-store sales data, foot traffic and national promotions, mobile has revolutionized digital shopper marketing.

Chris leaded with the statement that “Cookie based static audiences segments are irrelevant for Shopping Marketers.”

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He went on to explain that by focusing less on cookies, and more on mobile first data, Shopper Marketers can capture personal moments and a deeper awareness of location and in-between moments (browsing without intent). Unlike cookies, mobile first data gives a holistic understanding of the shopper and their behaviors which benefits both the brand and retailer.

Mobile First Data

Gilad Amitai, COO and Co-Founder of Ubimo, supported the conversation by addressing the importance of reaching the right person (based on demographic data, historical location data, DMA affinity data and audience graph) at the perfect moment (the right time and place).

Tactics

The core of the conversation aimed to address how brands can promote products in thousands of national outlets, while keeping messaging personal, local and relevant to individual consumers. The solution provided? Brands must break through the ‘battleground’, defined as the context around the store including real-world context, area culture, demographics and store affinity, and to reach the perfect person at the perfect moment.

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But how can brands effectively do this?

AMP partners with Ubimo and their “Project X” product to allow shopper marketing companies to understand sales data for specific products in specific stores measured against Ubimo Metrics.

This near real-time sales data is then matched to mobile media spends supporting in-store efforts, which allows marketers to understand the result in individual product sales lift based on supporting marketing.

When this data is coupled with Ubimo’s proprietary location and user data, companies can extract powerful insights about the effectiveness of their advertising budget, while also building deeper audience segments for specific “battlegrounds” around core store locations.

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This dynamic partnership may be just the solution you are looking for, shopper marketers. It’s a data driven world out there and AMP and Ubimo are on a mission to help you make sense of it. If you are interested in learning more about how to leverage these unique solutions, contact us today.

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February 24, 2016

AMP Shopper Digital Partners with Retailigence to Deliver Location-based Shopper Activation at Scale

SAN FRANCISCO — February 16, 2016Retailgence, a leading provider of retail intelligence for inventory-aware marketing and location-based shopper activation for brand manufacturers, and AMP Shopper Digital, a leading digital marketing & advertising agency focused on delivering solutions that drive shoppers to retail for global brands, today announced a partnership to jointly deliver location-based shopper activation working with AMP’s preferred Ad-Tech partners in media buying, dynamic creative, optimization and measurement capabilities.

The companies will work collaboratively to provide advanced Geo-Targeting, Dynamic Creative and Path-to-Purchase Measurement capabilities, building off the Retailigence product location data platform. Working together, the companies will enable brand manufacturers to increase advertising relevance and efficiency by serving geo-targeted digital ads in and around retail stores with advertised products in-stock, avoiding stores out-of-stock, and guiding consumers with location-based secondary actions within the ad unit, including store directions, phone calls and more. As a result of the partnership, manufacturers working with AMP Shopper Digital will be able to leverage the combined expertise of the agency’s integrated digital media strategy and execution as well as Retailigence’s data technology in order to drive location relevance and incremental in-store product sales, insights and attribution. The ability to integrate and optimize large amounts of accurate product and location data quickly eliminates the time-consuming process of aggregating inventory data across retail partners to deliver performance and results quickly for marketers.

“Shopper marketers face a huge challenge in capturing accurate information about their products at retail for use in digital marketing to drive in-store sales,” said SVP of AMP Shopper Digital Josh Pike. “Retailigence allows us the ability to bring disparate location and retail inventory data elements together in an efficient manner to distribute through our dynamic digital media buying process. Our clients can now access vast amounts of channel data and benefit from advanced optimization without the time and cost typical in managing data for cross-channel retail campaigns.”

“Brand manufacturers look to the Retailigence product location platform to truly help them build local relevancy into shopper marketing as they support their retail partners and reach more mobile customers wherever they are.” said Retailigence CEO Hoon Chung.” In order to do so, we not only need to provide accurate information about product availability, but also guide them throughout the customer journey from top of funnel research to moment of buying decision.” AMP Agency and their partners will be instrumental in helping deliver this to our mutual customers.”

About AMP Shopper Digital

As part of the Advantage Solutions Family of Retail and CPG-focused companies, AMP Shopper Digital exists for one purpose: to build and execute turnkey, performance-based digital programs that engage shoppers, drive more shopping trips and higher basket ring. AMP Shopper Digital has offices in Boston, MA,  Norwalk, CT, Bentonville, AR and Chicago, IL.. To learn more, visit http://ampshopperdigital.com  and follow us on Twitter @AMP_Agency and on LinkedIn.

About Retailigence

Retailigence is an online-to-offline data platform, embeddable in any ad campaign or media, which improves in-store product sales, attribution-related metrics and ROI.  The Company’s unique SKU-level data insights target consumers with the highest propensity to buy local and guide shoppers along the path to purchase to any specific product or brand, in more than 200,000 brick-and-mortar stores in the U.S.  Major brands, retailers, agencies, and ad technology providers use Retailigence to ensure their marketing investments (often starting in mobile) not only generate consumer awareness, but convert shopper interest into measurable action and in-store sales.

To learn more, visit www.retailigence.com. Follow us on Twitter @Retailigence and on LinkedIn.

February 6, 2012

Hello, my name is Shaylan, and I'm a PIN-A-HOLIC.

I remember it like it was yesterday'?¦ It was a rainy Sunday in August when my Pinterest invite finally came. Coffee in hand, I began emptying the countless links I had saved in my browser favorites, organizing them onto my cleverly named virtual pinboards. I won't tell you how many hours it took before I forced myself to tear my glazed over eyes away from my MacBook. Seriously, it was worse than when I read the entire Hunger Games series in two days. Let's keep that between us, ok?

Anyway, if you haven't heard of Pinterest, or like my fiancé you refuse to comprehend what it is and why I and others spend so much time 'pinning'? ' simply put ' it's a virtual bulletin board. According to Pinterest, the site 'lets you organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web.'? The reason Pinterest is likely so popular? It combines the traditional social network concept of sharing, with compelling visual content. In other words not only is the site easy to use, it's really pretty! While I haven't built my walk-in closet yet, I've virtually filled it on Pinterest. I've also decorated my entire house, planned my wedding and armed myself with several projects in the event that I decide to become crafty. And, lately, that red notification that someone 'liked'? something I posted on Facebook just doesn't give me the twinge of satisfaction I feel when someone 'repins'? something from one of my boards.

Pinterest is not new news, and I'm not the only one wondering & blogging about why brands aren't utilizing this channel, or speculating on how they should be. Just last week Mashable touted the network's referral traffic (more than Google+, YouTube and LinkedIn combined in January). When I registered for Pinterest, the first thing I did after following my friends who were using the network was search for my favorite media outlets and brands, but most of them were nowhere to be found.

Pinterest isn't right for every brand, and it needs to be approached creatively & with strategy'?¦but if an opportunity exists to provide content and boost consumer engagement it seems like a no brainer. The biggest reason I see an opportunity for marketers? Since I became a member, Pinterest has driven (several) of my purchase decisions.

How do you think brands should take advantage of this platform?

January 3, 2011

Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality.

With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies.

For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business!

Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience.

Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011?

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality.
With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies.
For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business!
Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience.
Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011?
Path:

January 3, 2011

Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality.

With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies.

For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business!

Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience.

Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011?

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality.
With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies.
For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business!
Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience.
Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011?
Path:

December 16, 2010

Do the Snozzberries Taste Like Snozzberries?

'If you want to view paradise, simply look around and view it'? sings Willy Wonka in the famous film from 1971. The candy company of the same name has taken this line to heart, and recently opened an imaginative new sweets shop within the famous Times Square Toys 'R Us store. This unique retail environment, serving as the brand's first official 'Wonka Store,'? is a state of the art example of an in-store brand experience. As consumers enter the World of Wonka they find candy trees, mushroom tables, edible gardens and swirls of multi-colored factory equipment. The entire store, from the imaginative product displays to the fascinating lighting, is meant to be 'a new adventure everywhere you turn,'? according to Janet Planet, innovation manager of the Wonka Experience. This retail investment is complemented by an exciting website that encourages consumers to 'Feed Your Imagination,'? print & TV ads, and new digital vending machines where consumers can create a custom bag of candy.

I personally love the Wonka brand and am easily tempted by the mouthwatering displays and designs which bring Willy Wonka's world to life. In fact, after browsing only a handful of photos and reading about the flagship store, I am more than persuaded to visit the next time I'm in Manhattan and feast my eyes on what it has to offer. I may be a big kid at heart, but then again'?¦isn't everyone? And isn't that the point of shopper marketing to make adults feel like they're kids again in the wonderful world of Willy Wonka? It's a magical place where adults can forget about their strict diets and enjoy the simple yet splendid pleasures of a Scrumdiddlyumptious Bar.

With the growing technology of today, the global marketplace is more competitive than ever. Due to this, shopper marketing is becoming a fundamental consideration, and many leading retailers, including P&G, have realized that the 'big idea'? should keep the retail experience in mind. It's not Mad Men style anymore where one ad can win over the consumer; the fact is, many purchase decisions are made within the retail environment.

Wonka has recognized that consumers must be engaged at various stages along their path to purchase, and to achieve this, the brand has created a strong brand personality by integrating its website, advertisements, and the new and delicious Wonka World. Next time I'm in New York I'll let you know if the snozzberries are as good as they look on film.

Source: http://www.shoppermarketingmag.com/2010-12/

December 15, 2010

Holiday Shopping'?¦ Mobilized.

Who wants to spend hours on end waiting in lines at the mall when you can take care of your holiday shopping via your mobile device? Between check-in deals, social coupons, scanner and price comparison apps, shopping has never been so easy. But does it really match up to the holiday spirit of in-store shopping?

Smartphones have developed so drastically over their short lifespan that the current technology allows for users to stay connected as much as you can from a computer, without even having to be connected to one. The phones have more power than ever before, and even larger viewing screens to assist consumers in these mobile shopping sprees. Shoppers frequently conduct research before making a purchase in-store or online, whether they are looking for the best price or consumer reviews on the product. This process has been simplified, as these new mobile search capabilities are not only helping the sales cycle in-store, but they are now enabling us to search for and purchase items all from one mobile device.

According to eMarketer.com and IDC Retail Insights, mobile shopping will account for 28% of holiday shopping this season, which translates into $127 billion of the $447 billion in holiday spending that has been forecasted by the National Retail Federation (NRF) for the U.S. Therefore, it has become more relevant for retailers to create a mobile presence either through a mobile app or an easy-to-use mobile web interface. In a recent survey conducted by Google, nearly half of the smartphone users questioned claimed that they were 'very'? or 'extremely likely'? to download a mobile app for their holiday shopping this year. According to Stacy Janiak, United States Retail Practice Leader at Deloitte, 'We are at the cusp of this technology really driving a lot of activity during the shopping season'?¦ It is both an opportunity and a challenge for a retailer, because you can have a consumer who can cross-shop your store with other brick-and-mortar stores or online, all from the convenience of your aisle.'?

For example, J.C. Penney launched an integrated marketing campaign in mid-November ('New list. New Gifts. Who Knew'?), that helped to showcase the chain as the place to find gifts that will top everyone's Christmas list. The campaign helped to raise awareness of the quality and breadth of merchandise that the retailer has to offer, and included national television spots, outdoor ads, print, digital, direct mail and of course mobile and social networking. The launch of their new mobile app, specifically for the holiday season (m.jcp.com), should be highlighted, as it allows consumers to make purchases right from their smartphone, while checking-in on Foursquare and Facebook Deals to receive special in-store offers. Mobile coupons are also sent to consumers via text-message, which give them the option to receive special offers.

However, one must raise the question of whether or not mobile shopping can really equate to that of in-store shopping during the holiday season. Part of the holiday tradition in my family is taking the time to make our lists, and visit the stores together for an evening of holiday cheer as we purchase gifts for family and friends. Some may argue that there is a lack of holiday spirit in shopping online, as you are not emerged in the excitement, smells of the holiday season, or the joy of stumbling upon the perfect gift that you may not have thought of otherwise. Technology can only do so much around the holidays; the rest is all found in the full-on experience of traditional holiday shopping. I, for one, will always take part in the experience regardless of how crazy the malls may be. Nothing in my mind can beat the holiday rush, as it only comes but once a year!

December 13, 2010

Self-Serve Car Shopping?

Last week at the Denver airport, ready to board a four-hour flight to Boston and excited to watch a freshly downloaded movie, I had a horrible realization. The right side speaker on my headphones wasn't working and it was going to drive me nuts.

The headphones that failed me weren't fancy, but the horror had more to do with the bad timing.  Pre-boarding for the flight had started, and I was a few moving sidewalks away from a store that would have a replacement. It's a long flight and I was looking forward to watching Eclipse (don't judge).

Given the dire situation, I ended up buying headphones from a Best Buy vending machine. Maybe I just haven't been paying attention, but I don't remember ever seeing anyone buying something from one before (and I don't think that I'm alone, because I actually drew a crowd of on-lookers), but it was an intuitive and pleasant shopping experience. And, besides being quick and easy, there were a host of tools available for me to research and evaluate the purchase that I was about to make.

With a non-traditional vending purchase now under my belt, I've been thinking about it ' are self-serve machines the super-convenient Jetson-esque future of shopping suited perfectly for the tech-savvy and time-starved? Or, just another way for retailers to extend their brands, create word-of-mouth, and cost-effectively sample their products?

Theoretically, the consumer shopping experience is not all that different than online shopping (while you can't touch/try the product, you can research it), but with the benefit of seeing it and enjoying the instant gratification of having the product upon purchase.

Besides Best Buy, other retailers and brands in the self-serve vending game at airports and malls include The Body Shop, Sephora, and ProActive, but the one that I found particularly interesting is the uber-luxury vending machine called the Semi-Automatic that can be found at the Mondrian South Beach. Said machine offers the intuitive travel staples like a toothbrush (albeit, designer brand) for hotel guests, along with Bentley convertibles and condos (say what?), with prices ranging from $10 to $1 million+.

Whether these vending machines become the preferred retail channel of the future or remain more of a marketing tool, I think they're going to pick up steam, catering to consumers' desire for ease and convenience.  What is your take on where they go and what they sell?

December 13, 2010

Self-Serve Car Shopping?

Last week at the Denver airport, ready to board a four-hour flight to Boston and excited to watch a freshly downloaded movie, I had a horrible realization. The right side speaker on my headphones wasn't working and it was going to drive me nuts.

The headphones that failed me weren't fancy, but the horror had more to do with the bad timing.  Pre-boarding for the flight had started, and I was a few moving sidewalks away from a store that would have a replacement. It's a long flight and I was looking forward to watching Eclipse (don't judge).

Given the dire situation, I ended up buying headphones from a Best Buy vending machine. Maybe I just haven't been paying attention, but I don't remember ever seeing anyone buying something from one before (and I don't think that I'm alone, because I actually drew a crowd of on-lookers), but it was an intuitive and pleasant shopping experience. And, besides being quick and easy, there were a host of tools available for me to research and evaluate the purchase that I was about to make.

With a non-traditional vending purchase now under my belt, I've been thinking about it ' are self-serve machines the super-convenient Jetson-esque future of shopping suited perfectly for the tech-savvy and time-starved? Or, just another way for retailers to extend their brands, create word-of-mouth, and cost-effectively sample their products?

Theoretically, the consumer shopping experience is not all that different than online shopping (while you can't touch/try the product, you can research it), but with the benefit of seeing it and enjoying the instant gratification of having the product upon purchase.

Besides Best Buy, other retailers and brands in the self-serve vending game at airports and malls include The Body Shop, Sephora, and ProActive, but the one that I found particularly interesting is the uber-luxury vending machine called the Semi-Automatic that can be found at the Mondrian South Beach. Said machine offers the intuitive travel staples like a toothbrush (albeit, designer brand) for hotel guests, along with Bentley convertibles and condos (say what?), with prices ranging from $10 to $1 million+.

Whether these vending machines become the preferred retail channel of the future or remain more of a marketing tool, I think they're going to pick up steam, catering to consumers' desire for ease and convenience.  What is your take on where they go and what they sell?

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