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The New Food Plate and the Rise of Infographics

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced its replacement to the widely-despised Food Pyramid with a new icon: MyPlate. MyPlate is a vastly improved aesthetic guide for eating. It's colorful, clear and emphasizes portion control. The food pyramid, which was used for 20 years and updated in 2005, never made much sense to me. How big were the recommended serving sizes? And what was with the density of foods at the base of the pyramid? They made the pyramid appear crowded and confusing. The pyramid also lost my trust over the years when it was revealed that listed servings were influenced by the agricultural industry segments that held the most clout. Although MyPlate needs progress in terms of its actual content (why does it list sugary drinks like chocolate milk in the dairy section?), it's leaps and bounds from cheap brand cialis the pyramid from an illustrative standpoint. It's a memorable visual shortcut that will prove useful for Michelle Obama's Let's Move initiative. After all, we're a population with an attention span shortening by the second. In today's busy digital world, we need concise information at a glance. Our web is comprised of more than 163 million blogs, 234 million websites, and 50 million tweets per day. That's a lot of content. Infographics such as MyPlate help in that they use a single, easy-to-understand image to communicate complex data. They transform data jargon into comprehensible information. They also add creativity and color, turning what would be an otherwise boring subject matter into a standout, impactful icon. I like to think of it as an 'arts meets science'? approach. Perhaps most importantly, infographics allow us to easily share content, leading to strong viral potential. It's no surprise that as the public continues to face a plethora of data, infographics will become more widely used by brands. Even those that already employ them such as news organizations like USA Today, powerhouse companies like Ernst & Young, and even the federal government, will continue to use them in different ways. Equally important to note is that infographics can be used poorly, too. Excessive information (or insufficient information), improper formats for data and other mishaps can defeat the purpose of infographics, so it's crucial to recognize how and when to use them. In today's whirlwind world filled with an overabundance of data and speckled with anti-obesity campaigns, it is only natural that the government would revamp the food pyramid. Kudos on this effort. Perhaps next time the USDA can work on the actual content, but at least we're moving in the right direction.

Applying Apple's Success Factors To Our Brands

Apple overtook Google in this year's 'Top 100 Most Valuable Brands'? BrandZ study, which brand consultancy Millward Brown recently released. The technology giant nabbed the top ranking after receiving an 84 percent increase in brand value this year while Google dropped by two percent. As a result, Google (which held the number one spot for four years straight) took the second ranking, followed consecutively by IBM, McDonald's, Microsoft and Coca Cola. The annual BrandZ study identifies and ranks brands using a number of factors, including an 'estimate of the brand's contribution to earnings, valuation of intangible assets, measures of customer perception and an estimate of growth potential,'? according to the Financial Times. While it's no wonder Apple received the number one ranking this year due to the wild success of its iPad and iPhone, it makes me wonder, 'What are the overarching communications and business factors that lead to Apple's success?' And better yet, 'How can we apply them to our brands?' Constant innovation. Apple is a leader, not a follower. It's continuous how much is prednisone advancement and groundbreaking product line sets the company apart. 'By nurturing its brand and constantly innovating, Apple is able to command a high price premium and weather economic turbulence, providing a global business success story that other brands can learn from,'? said Eileen Brown, CEO of Millward Brown. We need to push our brands to persistently strive to do greater things instead of taking breathers after bouts of success. Whether it's creating new products or developing new 'outside of the box'? marketing initiatives, the need for reinvention is critical in today's competitive landscape. Selling an experience. Apple doesn't just sell products, it sells an experience. It leverages eye-pleasing store aesthetics, 'user experience'?-focused commercials, and smartly-crafted communications messaging to convey the experiential benefit of its brand. In fact, check out its recent press release announcing the latest version of its iMac; Apple used 80 adjectives in 10 paragraphs to describe the experience! We should guide our brands to focus on user experience through our marketing strategies. Oftentimes, consumers may not remember specific product details, but they remember their overall experience and related feelings associated with the product. Capitalizing on this notion is a great way to generate effective marketing campaigns. Understanding the target audience. Apple researches and understands its consumers. It launched its iPod in 2001 and despite the fact that digital music players had been around for the previous three years, Apple wanted to be the first to 'make a big splash'? by understanding what consumers want in their portable digital music players. Apple's research revealed that consumers want to bring as much music with them as possible when on-the-go, but in the least obtrusive way. This revelation inspired Apple to make the iPod sleek and small, yet able to hold 1,000 songs. By 2004, Apple had sold more than three million iPods, creating a billion-dollar business for Apple. We should encourage our brands to conduct both qualitative and quantitative research. By equipping our brands with a fresh perspective, they will have a strong competitive advantage. After all, what 'works'? may not be obvious to the naked eye. In today's competitive world, the race to the top can be challenging and downright taxing. Inputting basic principles from Apple, the wizard in the world of tech, can give us the competitive advantage we need for success.

Three Lessons From McDonald's: #Winner in the Face of Adversity

When McDonald's is faced with adversity, it fights back. Hard. Take a glimpse at its history and you'll find key learnings that we can apply to our clients and brands. McDonald's struggles date back to the 1970s when it began to endure criticism for its environmental policies. Seeing the need to keep a favorable public opinion, the golden-arched giant began to implement packaging reduction efforts. Today, it uses 25 grams of packaging for a Big Mac, fries and drink; in the 1970s, it was 46 grams. Do the math and that's a 46 percent reduction. Lesson #1: Listen To and Evolve with Customers ' Over the years, McDonald's has listened and adapted to its customers' demands. We need to do the same on behalf of our clients and brands. With social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter, it's easier than ever to listen and engage our customers. By closely monitoring customer, industry and environmental trends, we'll stay ahead of the curve and enable ourselves to become early adapters. When movies Super Size Me (2004) and Fast Food Nation (2006) slammed McDonald's ' and fast-food restaurants across the nation faced mounting pressure from the FDA to clean up their menus ' McDonald's revitalized its menu. It faded out Super Sized french fries and soft drinks, and began to offer healthier food options. McDonald's then embarked on a full-scale advertising campaign to tout its healthier menu ' reaching mainstream consumers via TV and billboards. In 2010, McDonald's launched an extensive Global Best of Green marketing campaign to emphasize its green-friendly procedures, creating a website and consumer and media-facing full report about its efforts ' which includes an Energy All-Stars program that rewards McDonald's managers in US locations for finding ways to conserve energy, to its implementation of new recycling methods for cooking oil, among other tactics. Lesson #2: Don't Be Afraid To Publicize Good Work ' Clearly, McDonald's is not afraid to show off its corporate responsibility (CR) initiatives throughout the years ' whether through reports, media outreach or full-scale advertising campaigns. If your client or brand is undertaking CR initiatives or supporting a special cause, make sure you tell it to the world through effective communications. Otherwise, no one will know. Today, McDonald's is continuing to battle issues, such as public disdain for its direct advertising to children via Happy Meal toys and its reincarnation of Ronald the clown. Luckily for McDonald's, it has a blog entitled 'Values in Practice'? that features information about its corporate responsibility initiatives, including its Global Marketing Guidelines for communicating responsibly to children. Lesson #3: Tell Your Story or Someone Else Will ' When facing communications crises you have two choices: 1) you can ignore the conversations and hope they go away or 2) you can tell your side of the story. McDonald's chose the latter through its blog. After all, if it doesn't tell its story, someone else will. Blogs are a useful tool for your client or brand to speak to the world with a megaphone and provide real-time responses to criticism, as well as promote corporate responsibility initiatives. Why not take advantage of such a great tool? As you can see from this brief glimpse into McDonald's history, ongoing attacks have plagued the fast-food giant, but so have smart communications and business decisions. We can learn from McDonald's and take these lessons back Pharmacy cialis to our everyday work with our clients and brands. #Win

  • 3 min read
  • April 26, 2011

Three Lessons From McDonald's: #Winner in the Face of Adversity

When McDonald's is faced with adversity, it fights back. Hard. Take a glimpse at its history and you'll find key learnings that we can apply to our clients and brands. McDonald's struggles date back to the 1970s when it began to endure criticism for its environmental policies. Seeing the need to keep a favorable public opinion, the golden-arched giant began to implement packaging reduction efforts. Today, it uses 25 grams of packaging for a Big Mac, fries and drink; in the 1970s, it was 46 grams. Do the math and that's a 46 percent reduction. Lesson #1: Listen To and Evolve with Customers ' Over the years, McDonald's has listened and adapted to its customers' demands. We need to do the same on behalf of our clients and brands. With social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter, it's easier than ever to listen and engage our customers. By closely monitoring customer, industry and environmental trends, we'll stay ahead of the curve and enable ourselves to become early adapters. When movies Super Size Me (2004) and Fast Food Nation (2006) slammed McDonald's ' and fast-food restaurants across the nation faced mounting pressure from the FDA to clean up their menus ' McDonald's revitalized its menu. It faded out Super Sized french fries and soft drinks, and began to offer healthier food options. McDonald's then embarked on a full-scale advertising campaign to tout its healthier menu ' reaching mainstream consumers via TV and billboards. In 2010, McDonald's launched an extensive Global Best of Green marketing campaign to emphasize its green-friendly procedures, creating a website and consumer and media-facing full report about its efforts ' which includes an Energy All-Stars program that rewards McDonald's managers in US locations for finding ways to conserve energy, to its implementation of new recycling methods for cooking oil, among other tactics. Lesson #2: Don't Be Afraid To Publicize Good Work ' Clearly, McDonald's is not afraid to show off its corporate responsibility (CR) initiatives throughout the years ' whether through reports, media outreach or full-scale advertising campaigns. If your client or brand is undertaking CR initiatives or supporting a special cause, make sure you tell it to the world through effective communications. Otherwise, no one will know. Today, McDonald's is continuing to battle issues, such as public disdain for its direct advertising to children via Happy Meal toys and its reincarnation of Ronald the clown. Luckily for McDonald's, it has a blog entitled 'Values in Practice'? that features information about its corporate responsibility initiatives, including its Global Marketing Guidelines for communicating responsibly to children. Lesson #3: Tell Your Story or Someone Else Will ' When facing communications crises you have two choices: 1) you can ignore the conversations and hope they go away or 2) you can tell your side of the story. McDonald's chose the latter through its blog. After all, if it doesn't tell its story, someone else will. Blogs are a useful tool for your client or brand to speak to the world with a megaphone and provide real-time responses to criticism, as well as promote corporate responsibility initiatives. Why not take advantage of such a great tool? As you can see from this brief glimpse into McDonald's history, ongoing attacks have plagued the fast-food giant, but so have smart communications and business decisions. We can learn from McDonald's and take these lessons back Pharmacy cialis to our everyday work with our clients and brands. #Win

AMP's Guide to Landing Media Coverage

by Melia Dayeh, Senior Account Executive, Integrated Public Relations Many agencies take different approaches to media pitching. At AMP, we not only use our strong media connections to earn coverage for our clients, but we also recognize the importance of addressing the media's unique needs through our everyday outreach. Here are a few of our guidelines for securing media coverage. 1. Target the appropriate media contacts. Take the time to plan ahead and research the reporters and editors you should be pitching to. It's called homework and yes, it's important in the PR industry. Read the reporters and editors' most recent news stories and learn whether or not they're the right contact for your story. Each reporter and editor has a personal style and preference, so keep that in mind when deciding who to pitch. If you're pitching an environmental editor and your story is more appropriate for the technology section of a newspaper, then you can say 'bye-bye'? to earning a placement. Putting time and effort into doing your homework may mean that you're not able to reach as many media contacts, but remember: Quality over quantity is essential when it comes to landing placements. It will pay off! 2. Create customized and genuine pitches. Reporters have jobs to do and deadlines to meet. Don't waste their time by pitching generalized templates. Make sure you communicate to the reporter why your story fits his/her specific coverage and writing style. Personalize each and every pitch so you're addressing what each media contact is most interested in. And don't forget, media is no different than the rest of us. They love compliments on their work; after all, who doesn't? If you've read a particular interesting or compelling story by a reporter, make sure to mention that when pitching to him/her. By doing so, you're letting the reporter know that: a) you actually read their work, b) you understand their style and therefore know what to pitch, and c) you are a fan and believer of their work. Creating customized pitches means that you'll be promoting two-way communication with reporters ' not using a one-way pitch that a reporter will delete from his/her inbox. 3. Pitch in a short and concise manner. Reporting is one of the busiest professions. Respect that notion, along with the fact that reporters generally write in a brief, factual manner ' and don't send lengthy, wordy pitches filled with jargon. Better yet, if you have facts on hand that support your story, make sure to use them in your pitch. On that same note of brevity, don't bog down your email pitches with attachments, even if those attachments contain relevant information. Reporters receive hundreds of pitches a day and they don't need their inboxes clogged. Instead, ask the media contact if he/she would like additional information sent in the form of an attachment or use a link with information instead. Trust me; your media contacts will appreciate your thoughtfulness. 4. Take the time to develop relationships with media beforehand. Don't make the mistake of only contacting reporters and editors when you need them. With social media, it's now easier than ever to directly access the media using Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and more. By building relationships with media contacts ahead of time, they're more likely to listen when you pitch. Friend and follow three reporters to start off and see what it's like. Reporters are working under a lot of pressure and great time constraints so if you can offer a hand, friendly yet useful conversation, or better yet ' a great story ' you'll develop a relationship in no time. 5. Ensure your pitch is newsworthy. In today's cutthroat world, it's essential that your pitch is newsworthy for placement. The last thing you want a reporter to think when they read your pitch is, 'So what?'? Here are some elements of newsworthiness to use as guidance: Timeliness ' Make sure your story covers a new or current topic. Significance ' The more people affected by your story's topic, the better chances it will earn placement. Proximity ' Ensure your story is relevant not only to the geographical region of where you are pitching, but also the cultural undertones of the region. Prominence ' Famous people get more attention because they're famous. Plain and simple. Uniqueness ' Is your product the only one on the market that can do something in particular? If so, you have a better chance of earning placement. Human interest ' Stories that appeal to emotion tend to earn more placement. Readers like a story that pulls at their heart strings. After earning media placement, it is important to follow up with the media contacts and thank them for their time. Remember, this is not a 'one-and-done'? industry. Media relations is an ongoing effort.

AMP's Guide to Landing Media Coverage

by Melia Dayeh, Senior Account Executive, Integrated Public Relations Many agencies take different approaches to media pitching. At AMP, we not only use our strong media connections to earn coverage for our clients, but we also recognize the importance of addressing the media's unique needs through our everyday outreach. Here are a few of our guidelines for securing media coverage. 1. Target the appropriate media contacts. Take the time to plan ahead and research the reporters and editors you should be pitching to. It's called homework and yes, it's important in the PR industry. Read the reporters and editors' most recent news stories and learn whether or not they're the right contact for your story. Each reporter and editor has a personal style and preference, so keep that in mind when deciding who to pitch. If you're pitching an environmental editor and your story is more appropriate for the technology section of a newspaper, then you can say 'bye-bye'? to earning a placement. Putting time and effort into doing your homework may mean that you're not able to reach as many media contacts, but remember: Quality over quantity is essential when it comes to landing placements. It will pay off! 2. Create customized and genuine pitches. Reporters have jobs to do and deadlines to meet. Don't waste their time by pitching generalized templates. Make sure you communicate to the reporter why your story fits his/her specific coverage and writing style. Personalize each and every pitch so you're addressing what each media contact is most interested in. And don't forget, media is no different than the rest of us. They love compliments on their work; after all, who doesn't? If you've read a particular interesting or compelling story by a reporter, make sure to mention that when pitching to him/her. By doing so, you're letting the reporter know that: a) you actually read their work, b) you understand their style and therefore know what to pitch, and c) you are a fan and believer of their work. Creating customized pitches means that you'll be promoting two-way communication with reporters ' not using a one-way pitch that a reporter will delete from his/her inbox. 3. Pitch in a short and concise manner. Reporting is one of the busiest professions. Respect that notion, along with the fact that reporters generally write in a brief, factual manner ' and don't send lengthy, wordy pitches filled with jargon. Better yet, if you have facts on hand that support your story, make sure to use them in your pitch. On that same note of brevity, don't bog down your email pitches with attachments, even if those attachments contain relevant information. Reporters receive hundreds of pitches a day and they don't need their inboxes clogged. Instead, ask the media contact if he/she would like additional information sent in the form of an attachment or use a link with information instead. Trust me; your media contacts will appreciate your thoughtfulness. 4. Take the time to develop relationships with media beforehand. Don't make the mistake of only contacting reporters and editors when you need them. With social media, it's now easier than ever to directly access the media using Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and more. By building relationships with media contacts ahead of time, they're more likely to listen when you pitch. Friend and follow three reporters to start off and see what it's like. Reporters are working under a lot of pressure and great time constraints so if you can offer a hand, friendly yet useful conversation, or better yet ' a great story ' you'll develop a relationship in no time. 5. Ensure your pitch is newsworthy. In today's cutthroat world, it's essential that your pitch is newsworthy for placement. The last thing you want a reporter to think when they read your pitch is, 'So what?'? Here are some elements of newsworthiness to use as guidance: Timeliness ' Make sure your story covers a new or current topic. Significance ' The more people affected by your story's topic, the better chances it will earn placement. Proximity ' Ensure your story is relevant not only to the geographical region of where you are pitching, but also the cultural undertones of the region. Prominence ' Famous people get more attention because they're famous. Plain and simple. Uniqueness ' Is your product the only one on the market that can do something in particular? If so, you have a better chance of earning placement. Human interest ' Stories that appeal to emotion tend to earn more placement. Readers like a story that pulls at their heart strings. After earning media placement, it is important to follow up with the media contacts and thank them for their time. Remember, this is not a 'one-and-done'? industry. Media relations is an ongoing effort.

"Thank You For Suing Us." Signed With Love, Taco Bell

When a lawsuit questioned Taco Bell's 'meat mixture' and allegations surfaced that the fast food giant's tacos contained a mere 35 percent of ground beef, the media had a field day. Reports of the lawsuit popped up in top-tier media coverage and consumers skeptical of what could go into a 99-cent taco quickly took conversations online. Tweets included, but were not limited to: 'Learning Taco Bell meat is not meat is like finding out cigarettes are addictive.'? 'So I guess wit Taco Bell revealin they beef is only 35% meat I has still upheld my New Year's resolution of eatin less meat??'? 'Just ate so much taco bell non-meat meat that I might die. Send my regards'?. With the clock ticking and pressure mounting, Taco Bell wasted no time fighting back. The company took out print ads only a few days later in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and our very own Boston Globe, to name a few. The ads boasted a bold 'Thank you for suing us'? headline and reiterated that Taco Bell uses 88 percent beef and 12 percent 'Secret Recipe.'? It then explained what the Secret Recipe entails ' including spices, water, and other seemingly trivial ingredients. But that wasn't all ' a campaign to reach its Hispanic customers; a YouTube video (cross-promoted on Facebook, Twitter and www.tacobell.com site) featuring President Greg Creed speaking about the company's beef facts; an 'Of course we use real beef!'?  microsite; and an aggressive online campaign on leading search engines and social media networks ' polished off the retort. So did Taco Bell's snappy response work? Let me start by saying that Taco Bell's response is more public and forceful than most other fast food giants. McDonald's, for example, still has not proactively addressed its lawsuit against including children's toys in its Happy Meals. Instead, the Golden Archs powerhouse has issued a reactive statement. By taking such an aggressive route, Taco Bell opened itself to risk. Such campaigning requires facts to be 100 percent foolproof. In other words, the company must be completely confident in the facts it presents to the public. However, with the appropriate amount of caution needed to fact-check, there is a high chance of reward, including positive publicity and a turnaround of negative brand perception. Taco Bell's speedy and confident response gave the company more control over the downward-spiraling situation. In fact, the day following the response, negative talk on Twitter only slightly led positive and neutral. And now, the plaintiff's attorneys are being questioned on the results of their beef testing. Not too shabby, Taco Bell! Not too shabby.

  • 2 min read
  • February 20, 2011

"Thank You For Suing Us." Signed With Love, Taco Bell

When a lawsuit questioned Taco Bell's 'meat mixture' and allegations surfaced that the fast food giant's tacos contained a mere 35 percent of ground beef, the media had a field day. Reports of the lawsuit popped up in top-tier media coverage and consumers skeptical of what could go into a 99-cent taco quickly took conversations online. Tweets included, but were not limited to: 'Learning Taco Bell meat is not meat is like finding out cigarettes are addictive.'? 'So I guess wit Taco Bell revealin they beef is only 35% meat I has still upheld my New Year's resolution of eatin less meat??'? 'Just ate so much taco bell non-meat meat that I might die. Send my regards'?. With the clock ticking and pressure mounting, Taco Bell wasted no time fighting back. The company took out print ads only a few days later in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and our very own Boston Globe, to name a few. The ads boasted a bold 'Thank you for suing us'? headline and reiterated that Taco Bell uses 88 percent beef and 12 percent 'Secret Recipe.'? It then explained what the Secret Recipe entails ' including spices, water, and other seemingly trivial ingredients. But that wasn't all ' a campaign to reach its Hispanic customers; a YouTube video (cross-promoted on Facebook, Twitter and www.tacobell.com site) featuring President Greg Creed speaking about the company's beef facts; an 'Of course we use real beef!'?  microsite; and an aggressive online campaign on leading search engines and social media networks ' polished off the retort. So did Taco Bell's snappy response work? Let me start by saying that Taco Bell's response is more public and forceful than most other fast food giants. McDonald's, for example, still has not proactively addressed its lawsuit against including children's toys in its Happy Meals. Instead, the Golden Archs powerhouse has issued a reactive statement. By taking such an aggressive route, Taco Bell opened itself to risk. Such campaigning requires facts to be 100 percent foolproof. In other words, the company must be completely confident in the facts it presents to the public. However, with the appropriate amount of caution needed to fact-check, there is a high chance of reward, including positive publicity and a turnaround of negative brand perception. Taco Bell's speedy and confident response gave the company more control over the downward-spiraling situation. In fact, the day following the response, negative talk on Twitter only slightly led positive and neutral. And now, the plaintiff's attorneys are being questioned on the results of their beef testing. Not too shabby, Taco Bell! Not too shabby.

Doing Good Through'?¦Twitter?

Last September, Eva Longoria introduced the first-ever, Twitter-based celebrity auction using TwitChange. TwitChange is one of the latest developments in the 'social good'? realm, serving as a celebrity charity auction where fans bid on an opportunity to be followed, mentioned or re-tweeted by their favorite celebrities with all of the earnings donated toward a cause. The month-long auction, which benefited building homes in Haiti, turned into an instant success. Flurries of fans requested their most beloved celebrities to enter. The result: 35 million hits; more than $540,000 toward the cause; and support from more than 175 celebrities including Justin Bieber, Shaquille O'Neal and Adrian Grenier. The media also loved the creativity of TwitChange's digital auction. "Twitter enthusiasts: Ever dream of having a celebrity follow and re-tweet your tweets? Here's your chance to have that dream come true. Even better? It's all in the name of good." - @USA Today 'In the Twitter universe, where a user is judged by how many followers he has, a celebrity follow or mention can be a catapult" - @Wall Street Journal With such a positive response, it's hard to imagine that TwitChange has adversaries, but it does. Some argue that the campaign is 'more about celebrity than actual charity'? and isn't likely lead to an impactful social activism movement. While I agree that TwitChange's celebrity component may outshine its 'social good'? component, calling out TwitChange as an overall bad concept nixes the idea that any form of charity is a good form of charity. To me, social giving through TwitChange may not be 'highly-involved social activism,'? but supporting a worthy cause with a platform that raises money and awareness is noteworthy and admirable. For those interested in participating or checking out TwitChange, the next auction will take place January 29, during which NFL star Troy Polamalu ' a star safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers ' will kick off an auction to benefit Operation Once in a Lifetime.

Doing Good Through'?¦Twitter?

Last September, Eva Longoria introduced the first-ever, Twitter-based celebrity auction using TwitChange. TwitChange is one of the latest developments in the 'social good'? realm, serving as a celebrity charity auction where fans bid on an opportunity to be followed, mentioned or re-tweeted by their favorite celebrities with all of the earnings donated toward a cause. The month-long auction, which benefited building homes in Haiti, turned into an instant success. Flurries of fans requested their most beloved celebrities to enter. The result: 35 million hits; more than $540,000 toward the cause; and support from more than 175 celebrities including Justin Bieber, Shaquille O'Neal and Adrian Grenier. The media also loved the creativity of TwitChange's digital auction. "Twitter enthusiasts: Ever dream of having a celebrity follow and re-tweet your tweets? Here's your chance to have that dream come true. Even better? It's all in the name of good." - @USA Today 'In the Twitter universe, where a user is judged by how many followers he has, a celebrity follow or mention can be a catapult" - @Wall Street Journal With such a positive response, it's hard to imagine that TwitChange has adversaries, but it does. Some argue that the campaign is 'more about celebrity than actual charity'? and isn't likely lead to an impactful social activism movement. While I agree that TwitChange's celebrity component may outshine its 'social good'? component, calling out TwitChange as an overall bad concept nixes the idea that any form of charity is a good form of charity. To me, social giving through TwitChange may not be 'highly-involved social activism,'? but supporting a worthy cause with a platform that raises money and awareness is noteworthy and admirable. For those interested in participating or checking out TwitChange, the next auction will take place January 29, during which NFL star Troy Polamalu ' a star safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers ' will kick off an auction to benefit Operation Once in a Lifetime.

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