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Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? Path:

Experiencing Life through Augmented Reality

While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? While assembling cables in a Boeing aircraft back in the 1990's, Tom Caudell coined the term 'augmented reality'? (AR) to describe a virtual display viewed through a headset, which guided workers through the process. However, you don't have to be a Boeing engineer to experience the same kind of thrill. Today, any NFL fan is exposed to AR by catching a glimpse of the '1st & Ten'? graphics system used on television during games. AR is a technique of overlaying graphics on a real-world image to enhance the scene, such as the yellow first-down line that can be seen on a televised football field- that is not there in reality. With recent developments in AR technology, we've seen a large influx of AR being used at retail for marketing, promotions and sales needs targeting consumers while at home, on-the-go, or in-store. AR allows for consumers to have an enhanced brand experience, and for retailers to connect with their target audience by utilizing engaging, interactive techniques rather than traditional marketing methods. A handful of retailers, including Ray-Ban, have successfully integrated AR into their marketing strategies. For over seventy years the Ray-Ban brand has been well-respected as one of the most iconic in the world, beginning as the official sunglass of U.S. Army fighter pilots through their line of Aviators, and also creating the timeless trend of the Wayfarer- both sported flawlessly, might I add, by Tom Cruise on the big screen in Top Gun and of course, Risky Business! Ray-Ban has taken their online product marketing strategy to a whole new digital realm, as consumers are now able to try on eyewear through a 'Virtual Mirror'?. By utilizing a web-cam, the e-commerce community can enter an augmented reality by positioning a pair of glasses over their own facial image to see how they would look sporting a number of Ray-Ban fashions. Created by the FittingBox Company, the technology uses a person's eyes, nose, and ears as AR-tracking markers to determine exactly how the glasses appear on the shopper's face. Being able to see the glasses on your face from the comfort of your computer chair is a significant enhancement to the online shopping experience. Ray-Ban has clearly recognized the potential of AR, and created internal and external strategies to distinguish themselves from their competition through the use of modern technology. What other AR examples have you seen in Shopper Marketing? Do you have plans to integrate AR in 2011? Path:

When Reality is Boring: Augment It!

It's election time which means, among hours of black and white negative campaign ads, it's time for CNN to go overboard with a new technology that adds little value to their reporting. In 2008, it was the Magic Wall that was amazingly spoofed on SNL. This year, their new toy was augmented reality. Now, we can't hate on A.R. ' we love it, we've blogged about it multiple times, and it has even become an office meme to yell out 'Augmented Reality'? in brainstorms without additional information behind it. But, the point of this post isn't to talk about our love (gosh, it really is cool) or hate for A.R., but more to discuss the use of new technology and marketing as a whole. Every year there always seems to be a new 'it'? tactic that brands want to employ. This is great, brands who are constantly pushing the next technology are better for it. However, many times it happens for the wrong reason. It's not because it's an effective vehicle to deliver a brand message, but rather because they saw a competitor use it, or they read an article about it and absolutely need it; NOW. As with anything; using it for the sake of using it without thinking about if it makes sense, or adds value to your consumers, is pointless. Seriously CNN, no one would think less of you if you simply showed a graph with an anchor voice-over. Was there any value added to your viewers by sticking your anchor behind a series of Tetris-like blocks? Absolutely not. So here's the learning. Push your brand, try new technology. When done right, it can create a great consumer experience and have a lasting effect on your brand. But understand that sometimes the best ideas are not simply based on the use of a new medium but come when we execute an older or traditional marketing channel really well, or in a way that no one has ever done.

Experience Augmented Reality

Imagine wearing a contact lens that displays information beamed from your cell phone. Sounds insane, right? Well the reality is that visual technology seen in movies like Iron Man and Minority Report is not so far away ' it's here. A team at the University of Washington is working on developing contact lenses that project graphics that float 50 centimeters to 1 mile away from the eye. It's crazy, but if this technology becomes accepted by consumers, imagine the possibilities! Price tags, product information, directions, and phone numbers could all be viewed right in front of your face! This could change the way people watch movies or even play video games. Technology is developing so rapidly these days, who knows what's coming next. For the full article, click here: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18146-contact-lenses-to-get-builtin-virtual-graphics.html

Virtual Insanity

Will Augmented Reality Be the Next Big Thing? Remember that scene in The Empire Strikes Back when Darth Vader cuts off Luke's hand? That was awesome. But there was another scene in Star Wars where Princess Leia sends Obi Wan Kenobi a holographic distress call. The first time I saw that scene I thought how cool it would be if someday we really had technology like that. Well, we do now'?¦sort of. Meet 'augmented reality'?. Augmented reality is a technology that merges the real world with computer-generated data. The augmented reality is displayed on a computer screen that shows the real world captured by camera then overlaid with computer graphics. From there, the user can interact with and manipulate the virtual content that is being displayed on-screen. Will augmented reality be next big thing? Well, that all depends on how well advertisers can identify meaningful ways to use the technology. Here are a handful of brands that have developed clever ways to implement augmented reality: USPS - Virtual Box Simulator USPS Unsure what size box you need when shipping a package? Fire up the handy Virtual Box Simulator to correctly size the box needed to ship your junk. This is a great application that fits well with the brand and provides a real benefit to customers. Topps ' 3D LIVE Topps- 3D Live Baseball cards have always sought to appeal to fans beyond the traditional card-collecting experience. In the past we've seen jigsaw puzzles, stickers, even brittle pieces of tasteless bubblegum. 3D LIVE brings a mini-game experience to fans that lets them control avatars of their favorite players. Wikitude Wikitude AR Travel This takes tourism to another level by allowing users to overlay a map and use their mobile device (presently Android mobile platform only) to display points of interest 'seen'? by the device's camera. PS3 - EyePet Eye Pet Aside from being able to shower your pet in virtual cookies or dress it up to look like Erik Estrada, users have the ability to create objects with which their pet can play. At this point users are limited to a few basic things that they can create, but it opens the possibility for even more customizable interactivity with the medium for future applications and games. Similar to the viral video phenomenon a while back, this is another innovative messaging vehicle for brands but it must be compelling and provide a real benefit/value to maximize impact. Imagine an application from IKEA that could help you virtually layout new furniture in your living room. What if Target could help students virtually decorate their dorm rooms when they move to college? What about a new sneaker from Nike that you could virtually try on and walk around in? Imagine SONY providing 3D step-by-step instructions to help you setup your new home theater system. The possibilities are endless; we just need to think outside the virtual box. How can your brand help augment reality?

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